Don’t you dare
Shrink yourself
For someone else’s comfort -
Do not become small
For people who refuse to grow.
m.v., Advice to my future daughter, #2.  (via efidelity)

(via ecstasymodels)

(Source: beyonseh, via nikki-minx)

fluerly:

im actually really afraid that no one will fall in love with me

Afraid they won’t stay in love.

(via bigmacqueen)

Still job searching. My current life.

Still job searching. My current life.

// I just got a phone call from a friend in the arts community. //

They have an opportunity they want to try to let me be a part of.

Dear Black Jesus please let this work!!!

Can I please get paid to do what I love? Please!

ghostofcommunism:

incompatibletype:

ghostofcommunism:

postracialcomments:


A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.
Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.
Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.
Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.
The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?
Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?
Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source
Thank you lieutenantnorals!

The dude was legitimately scared for his life because someone was sneaking into his apartment in the early morning. The cops are the ones who messed up here. No-knock warrants are really shitty.

so according to the criminal justice system, either you’re supposed to magically know when the person trying to break into your house is a cop looking for drugs that you don’t have, or you’re not allowed to shoot someone who’s trying to break into your house? oh wait, i forgot only white people are allowed to fatally shoot someone in this country without facing criminal penalties

Very much this. Our “justice” system is very much about maintaining the status quo that Power has created in this country.


The only purpose of the systems is to maintain the system. Let us never forget.

ghostofcommunism:

incompatibletype:

ghostofcommunism:

postracialcomments:

A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.

Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.

Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.

Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.

The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?

Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?

Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source

Thank you lieutenantnorals!

The dude was legitimately scared for his life because someone was sneaking into his apartment in the early morning. The cops are the ones who messed up here. No-knock warrants are really shitty.

so according to the criminal justice system, either you’re supposed to magically know when the person trying to break into your house is a cop looking for drugs that you don’t have, or you’re not allowed to shoot someone who’s trying to break into your house? oh wait, i forgot only white people are allowed to fatally shoot someone in this country without facing criminal penalties

Very much this. Our “justice” system is very much about maintaining the status quo that Power has created in this country.

The only purpose of the systems is to maintain the system. Let us never forget.

(via so-treu)

Blackness is the most hated thing on this planet until it is needed to build people’s business, social lives, and sense of style.

thespacegoat:

bryceckrispies:

thespacegoat:

what is snoop dogg even doing with his life

uhm excuse u bitch, u mean snoop LIONimage

no he went back to snoop dogg after realizing he hated being rastafarian because his hat was itchy

image

*deep sigh*

(via ashleyisking)

beyond-the-political-spectrum:

Who says, “Crime doesn’t pay?” When you consider the conviction rates and relative kid-glove treatment that white-collar criminal receive compared to the rest of us, it seems crime pays very well! In all but the most egregious of white collar-crimes (e.g., the Bernie Madoffs), most of us mere mortals who might get caught engaging in criminal activities can expect to be exiled to the deepest, darkest dungeons for stealing a loaf of bread…while others get to lap seemingly, and receive a wink and a nod (See also:  ”Bankers & The Economic Crisis…Throw The Bums in Jail!" and ‘More “Free Speech” Equals Less Democracy”)

beyond-the-political-spectrum:

Who says, “Crime doesn’t pay?” When you consider the conviction rates and relative kid-glove treatment that white-collar criminal receive compared to the rest of us, it seems crime pays very well! In all but the most egregious of white collar-crimes (e.g., the Bernie Madoffs), most of us mere mortals who might get caught engaging in criminal activities can expect to be exiled to the deepest, darkest dungeons for stealing a loaf of bread…while others get to lap seemingly, and receive a wink and a nod (See also:  ”Bankers & The Economic Crisis…Throw The Bums in Jail!" and ‘More “Free Speech” Equals Less Democracy”)

(via missnatis)

When did we become a country where the millionaires are jealous of the people on food stamps? A country that thinks teachers and fire fighters are soaking us dry? A country that thinks the richest who are paying the lowest taxes in 80 years are the ones being beaten up?

thebluelip-blondie:

zuriya:

you kno whats weird??? when i post something thats a 4+ paragraphs long and ppl reblog it within seconds? like you didnt even read. you just saw some special buzzwords that made your dick tingle.

i deadass could be like “ya mama is a stank garlic pussy havin hoe and i hope she breaks her back stumbling over her pussy hair” and as long as i throw it “dialectic” “imperialist” “praxis” and “racialization”, i woulda had you cosigning.

image

(via serenasirenjamaica)

sensei-aishitemasu:

Hip-Hop Is Failing Us

For a certain generation of people, the last great black revolutionary voices were Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. That’s not to say there weren’t other people doing similar work and holding court with similar opinions as these two men, but Martin and Malcolm are the Superman and Batman of the civil-rights movement. Rosa Parks would be considered Wonder Woman. The movement looked like these people, and the narrative presented in the media also sounded like them.

See also: Tef Poe On Ferguson, His Hometown: “The Mike Brown Rebellion Has Begun”

MLK’s face is tattooed on my left arm. His methods were, at times, actually very confrontational and called for direct action. He doesn’t get the credit he deserves in this regard because most people have sensationalized the non-violent aspects of his teachings. I think it’s important to forever honor MLK, Malcolm, Rosa and all of the greats from their class, but young folks today are inspired by a different kind of revolutionary voice.

The last great revolutionary voice of our time, in my opinion, was Tupac Shakur. The national anthem of Ferguson on the protest grounds is undoubtedly Lil Boosie’s “Fuck the Police.” This song became the anthem of many angry young protesters almost immediately. Most of the older folks marching with younger folks who asked them to stop using profanity never realized that the origin of those chants derived from the lyrics of this song.

Lil Boosie has more relevancy to Mike Brown’s peers than Al Sharpton does. Chief Keef’s perspective on how to handle police brutality is more politically correct than Jesse Jackson’s. For pseudo street-intellectuals like myself, Killer Mike is the mainstream voice we have selected to vicariously live through.

It’s important to have these people as your frame of reference when viewing Ferguson from a bird’s-eye view, because this is honestly the only way you’ll begin to understand the logic that caused us to fight back. Tupac Shakur was a bandanna-wearing, marijuana-smoking, middle-finger-flipping, book-reading, politically engaged young black man with anger issues. Our closest example of a push for revolution in America during our lifetime for the most part came from his war cry.

The current movement reflects people like him to the fullest — black males with their shirts off, tattoos all over their flesh and bandannas on their faces, covering their mouths from tear gas. The young women of the movement are equally bold and courageous. Women like MC Lyte, Queen Latifah, Lauryn Hill, Jean Grae, Lil Ki, and Da Brat are radicals within their own right. They have helped create a attitude among the women of the hip-hop generation that differs from the narrative of Deborah Johnson and Betty Shabazz. Even though these women were also powerful and courageous, today’s female activist and political organizer sports a different type of crown.

The attitude of the current generation is rooted in, “If you push me, I will certainly push you back.” Hip-hop helped evolve this spirit many moons ago. The simple notion of refusing to comply when someone asks you to pull your pants up or turn your hat around to the front are low-key ways of saying to society, “I will not march to the beat of your drum.”

This brings me to another point: As the hip-hop generation, at this current moment we are failing Mike Brown and the countless other victims of police brutality. Eric Garner of New York deserves more from us. Kajieme Powell of St. Louis deserves more from us. Now that the tanks and tear gas are gone, our brother Michael Brown deserves more from us. Marissa Alexander is behind bars without a voice, and she certainly deserves more from us.

I had high hopes that Michael Brown would be the wake-up call that forced hip-hop artists with mainstream influence to finally remember they are black in America. We’re talking about a male-dominated genre where everyone is a self-proclaimed badass when it comes to beefing with other rappers, but here we are in direct conflict with the police state, and both locally and nationally the response has been lackluster.

For years I listened to songs from local rappers speaking of the revolution. Well, the damn revolution landed in our back yard, and most of us dropped the ball or were too scared to show up to the party. This is a problem we can fix — it’s time to wake up and define our own destiny as a collective. In the words of Dead Prez, “It’s bigger than hip-hop.”

http://blogs.riverfronttimes.com/rftmusic/2014/09/hip-hop_is_failing_us.php

sensei-aishitemasu:

Hip-Hop Is Failing Us

For a certain generation of people, the last great black revolutionary voices were Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. That’s not to say there weren’t other people doing similar work and holding court with similar opinions as these two men, but Martin and Malcolm are the Superman and Batman of the civil-rights movement. Rosa Parks would be considered Wonder Woman. The movement looked like these people, and the narrative presented in the media also sounded like them.

See also: Tef Poe On Ferguson, His Hometown: “The Mike Brown Rebellion Has Begun”

MLK’s face is tattooed on my left arm. His methods were, at times, actually very confrontational and called for direct action. He doesn’t get the credit he deserves in this regard because most people have sensationalized the non-violent aspects of his teachings. I think it’s important to forever honor MLK, Malcolm, Rosa and all of the greats from their class, but young folks today are inspired by a different kind of revolutionary voice.

The last great revolutionary voice of our time, in my opinion, was Tupac Shakur. The national anthem of Ferguson on the protest grounds is undoubtedly Lil Boosie’s “Fuck the Police.” This song became the anthem of many angry young protesters almost immediately. Most of the older folks marching with younger folks who asked them to stop using profanity never realized that the origin of those chants derived from the lyrics of this song.

Lil Boosie has more relevancy to Mike Brown’s peers than Al Sharpton does. Chief Keef’s perspective on how to handle police brutality is more politically correct than Jesse Jackson’s. For pseudo street-intellectuals like myself, Killer Mike is the mainstream voice we have selected to vicariously live through.

It’s important to have these people as your frame of reference when viewing Ferguson from a bird’s-eye view, because this is honestly the only way you’ll begin to understand the logic that caused us to fight back. Tupac Shakur was a bandanna-wearing, marijuana-smoking, middle-finger-flipping, book-reading, politically engaged young black man with anger issues. Our closest example of a push for revolution in America during our lifetime for the most part came from his war cry.

The current movement reflects people like him to the fullest — black males with their shirts off, tattoos all over their flesh and bandannas on their faces, covering their mouths from tear gas. The young women of the movement are equally bold and courageous. Women like MC Lyte, Queen Latifah, Lauryn Hill, Jean Grae, Lil Ki, and Da Brat are radicals within their own right. They have helped create a attitude among the women of the hip-hop generation that differs from the narrative of Deborah Johnson and Betty Shabazz. Even though these women were also powerful and courageous, today’s female activist and political organizer sports a different type of crown.

The attitude of the current generation is rooted in, “If you push me, I will certainly push you back.” Hip-hop helped evolve this spirit many moons ago. The simple notion of refusing to comply when someone asks you to pull your pants up or turn your hat around to the front are low-key ways of saying to society, “I will not march to the beat of your drum.”

This brings me to another point: As the hip-hop generation, at this current moment we are failing Mike Brown and the countless other victims of police brutality. Eric Garner of New York deserves more from us. Kajieme Powell of St. Louis deserves more from us. Now that the tanks and tear gas are gone, our brother Michael Brown deserves more from us. Marissa Alexander is behind bars without a voice, and she certainly deserves more from us.

I had high hopes that Michael Brown would be the wake-up call that forced hip-hop artists with mainstream influence to finally remember they are black in America. We’re talking about a male-dominated genre where everyone is a self-proclaimed badass when it comes to beefing with other rappers, but here we are in direct conflict with the police state, and both locally and nationally the response has been lackluster.

For years I listened to songs from local rappers speaking of the revolution. Well, the damn revolution landed in our back yard, and most of us dropped the ball or were too scared to show up to the party. This is a problem we can fix — it’s time to wake up and define our own destiny as a collective. In the words of Dead Prez, “It’s bigger than hip-hop.”

http://blogs.riverfronttimes.com/rftmusic/2014/09/hip-hop_is_failing_us.php

(via wyld-n-free)

HEY Y'ALL YOU CAN JUST CALL ME T... I AM TO MANY THINGS TO FIT IN THIS LIL OL BOX. I AM UNDEFINED AND I FEEL LIKE SHARING. THIS IS MY LIFE AND HOW I LIVE IT! WELCOME TO MY WORLD! WATCH ME... LIVE, LOVE,LAUGH, LEARN..... GROW!! U HAVE ENTERED THE REABIT WHOLE. ALL THE ABOVE AND MORE.....SIMPLY ME........T________________________________ FOR MORE OF ME! INSTAGRAM , TWITTER & YOUTUBE: SIMPLYT22